Local Attractions

Edinburgh Castle - 0.4 miles
A majestic landmark which dominates the capital city's skyline just as it has dominated Scotland's long and colourful history. Edinburgh Castle is the best known and most visited of Historic Scotland's buildings. Perched on an extinct volcano and offering stunning views, this instantly recognisable fortress is a powerful national symbol, and part of Edinburgh's World Heritage Site. A rich mix of architectural styles reflects the castle's complex history and role as both stronghold and seat of Kings. The tiny St Margaret's Chapel, Edinburgh's oldest building, dates from the 1100s.

Georgian House - Edinburgh - 0.47 miles
The Georgian House is part of Robert Adam's masterpiece of urban design, Charlotte Square. It dates from 1796, when those who could afford it began to escape from the cramped, squalid conditions of Edinburgh's Old Town to settle in the fashionable New Town. The first owner, John Lamont, 18th Chief of the Clan Lamont, lived here with his family until 1815. The house's collections of beautiful china, shining silver, paintings and furniture all reflect the domestic surroundings and social conditions of the times. In the audio-visual room, video programmes describe the history of the New Town and in more dramatic form A Day in the Life of The Georgian House.


Edinburgh Centre - 0.5 miles
Edinburgh is the breathtakingly beautiful capital of Scotland, an exciting place to visit at any time of year. Edinburgh offers you superb sightseeing, historic buildings to explore, quiet galleries and museums to intrigue you, thrilling new attractions to discover, serious shopping, a vast choice of excellent Restaurants, Bistros, Wine Bars, Pubs and Cafes, and nightlife to suit all tastes. When the Picts built a fort on a volcanic crag in the 5th century, to protect Scotland from the invading Angles of Northumberland, Edinburgh's history began. The present Castle, was built on the site by Michael Canmore (1057-93); his wife St. Margaret, built the chapel which you can still visit today.


Museum of Scotland - 0.99 miles
The Museum of Scotland is a striking and impressive achievement, beautifully framed by its surroundings, by Edinburgh's Old and New Towns, and the landscape beyond. From the Museum's roof-top garden visitors will have an unrivalled view of the historical as well as architectural context of the new building. Edinburgh Castle , Greyfriars Kirk, the Scott Monument , the spires and pinnacles of the city, the sea, and the hills beyond interact with the new museum, reinforcing its role as a central point in the nation's heritage, a protector of Scotland 's treasures. In 1991 architects Benson + Forsyth were selected as winners of the architectural competition to design the new Museum of Scotland .


CARLTON HILL - 1.3 miles
Calton Hill is one of Edinburgh's main hills, set right in the city centre. It is unmistakable with its Athenian acropolis poking above the skyline. The acropolis is in fact an unfinished monument - originally called the "National Monument". Initiated in 1816, a year after Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo, it was meant to be a replica of the Parthenon in Athens, as a memorial to those who had died in the Napoleonic Wars.


HOLYROOD PALACE - 1.7 miles
Founded as a monastery in 1128, the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh is The Queen's official residence in Scotland. Situated at the end of the Royal Mile, the Palace of Holyroodhouse is closely associated with Scotland's turbulent past, including Mary, Queen of Scots, who lived here between 1561 and 1567. Successive kings and queens have made the Palace of Holyroodhouse the premier royal residence in Scotland.


SCOTT- MONUMENT - 0.9 miles
There are 287 steps to the top of the Scott Monument, from where you can enjoy breathtaking views of Edinburgh and the surrounding countryside. Find out about Sir Walter Scott and the monument in the museum room.


Edinburgh Zoo - Edinburgh - 2.2 miles
Edinburgh Zoo is part of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, a registered charity. The aim is: "to inspire and excite our visitors with the wonder of living animals, and so to promote the conservation of threatened species and habitats."


ARTHUR`S SEAT - 2.8 miles
So, you have reached Edinburgh. You have bought a kilt. You have learned that tartan patterns were cunningly encoded in heather twigs and hidden under turf roofs at the time of the English Occupation. You have missed the brass plaque pointing out the blood David Rizzio spilled in Holyrood. You have discovered there is no train to St Andrews. But you have not yet climbed Arthur's Seat. Really, there is no excuse. Arthur's Seat owns one of Scotland's most alluring outlines. Only the megalomaniac acorn of Suilven, 200 miles to the north-west and the megalomanic brassière of the Forth rail bridge can match it.


FORTH ROAD BRIDGE - 12 miles
The River Forth was first bridged by the Forth Bridge in 1890, a monumental piece of railway engineering and an iconic landmark. In 1964 the Forth Road Bridge opened to traffic and since then the narrowing of the Forth between Queensferry and North Queensferry has been home to two world class bridges. In 2016 a second Forth Road Bridge, the Queensferry Crossing, will open to traffic, taking a line to the west of the existing bridges. The header image is Transport Scotland's impression of what, by then, could well be the most impressive concentration of very large bridges anywhere in the world.